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Labyrrinth
06-13-2006, 11:00 AM
1233
Kudos’ to Blizzard. In their never-ending battle against gold farmers, they’ve recently banned another 30,000 World of Warcraft accounts. Given the size of their subscription base this may not seem like a lot, but it’s definitely another step in the right direction.


In keeping with Blizzard's aggressive stance against cheating in World of Warcraft, we banned over 30,000 accounts in the month of May, and with that removed well over 30 million gold from the economy across all realms. The banned accounts were taking part in activities that violate the game's Terms of Use, including using third-party programs to farm gold and items, which severely impacts the economy of a realm and the overall game enjoyment for all players.

Read the full article here (http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20060612-7033.html).

Razorwire
06-13-2006, 11:08 AM
Good for Blizzard and boo and hiss to Lord British! When the cornerstones of the CRPG do it there is someting wrong.

Navid
06-13-2006, 11:50 AM
thats awsome go blizzard! If they keep this up those farmers will up and leave, or become harder to detect.

on thing i was thinking though was this. Lets say all of them (est. maybe 45,000? at least) get benned and decide to go to a differnt game, lol it would toataly kill that game.

Anyway I hope they can find a ligit way of making money...

morg
06-13-2006, 12:16 PM
"...and with that removed over 30 million gold..." that's an average of 1000 gold per account O_o. These were mature accounts we're talking here, or heavily-laden mules at least. I know it's easy to level in WoW, but I would think this would be pretty hard work to recover from.

But like drugs from South America, there always seems to be more production than prevention.

Navid
06-13-2006, 12:44 PM
wow I didnt even think about that... 1k gold is alot in WOW huh?

Ok i am calulating how much potential money was lost for them and the average coast for 1k gold is 39$

so alltogether they(the famers) lost $1,170,000 am I calculating that right? 30mil gold /1,000 x39

Anyway If I did thats a pritty big dent...

smooth1
06-13-2006, 12:54 PM
That is always good news. Nothing worse than starting on a new server and seeing 20 level 60 hunters in a week all un-guilded farming like mad. Sad part is it will take them all of one week to re-group and be right back at it.

Painthane
06-13-2006, 04:19 PM
Those numbers are merely a drop in the bucket, and I'm sure anyone that's played WoW knows that. The game is absolutely rife with cheaters, goldfarmers, teleport-hackers, and banning 30,000 of them hardly makes a dent in the cheater's numbers.

Part of the reason that I quit WoW, other than the complete lack of things to do at endgame, was that no matter how much I played, or what I did, people that ebay thier cash and items, and teleport-hacking goldfarmers will have better. So really, why bother playing?

It's nice that they're making some attempt at least to stem the flow, but everyone knows it's just paying lip-service to the problem.

Marissa
06-14-2006, 03:10 AM
What I most wonder though, is how this can be stopped entirely. I know that the Goldfarmers won't agree with me, neither those who like to use their service, but it would be nice (and good for the in-games economy) if this kind of things hardly happened in Vanguard... or at all.

Preventing is always better than curing.

Would something as harsh as making cash 'nodrop' be the only way?

Eshu
06-14-2006, 12:10 PM
Their numbers are vague. They didn't say what percentage of accounts were banned for what infraction. It could be that a significant percentage was banned for non-farming/selling reasons.

As far as the farmers go...they will most likely just get a new account and power back to 60 and do it all over again and again until it isn't profitable. It's a win/win situation for Blizzard; they get another box sold to up their distribution numbers, and their monthly fee keeps coming in. :p

gremag
06-14-2006, 04:46 PM
Part of the reason that I quit WoW, other than the complete lack of things to do at endgame, was that no matter how much I played, or what I did, people that ebay thier cash and items, and teleport-hacking goldfarmers will have better. So really, why bother playing?

I've played EQ and WoW, and while I can't speak of what it would take to satisfy the hardcore (raiding daily) community, I will say that I find these series of arguments less and less compelling as time goes on. The WoW endgame continues to expand, and it can no longer be said that there is nothing to do at 60. Hardly. There are serious, probably unsolvable, problems that affect how much you *enjoy* your time at 60, but you certainly have any number of things to do: raid, 5-man, pvp, farm rep, etc. You'd have to belong to a pretty hardcore guild and have played from the beginning to be done with everything. But I fully acknowledge that the lack of consequence of death, ease of travel, immaturity of players, instanced content, and progression =gear is the very reason that WoW can never be the type of experience that I want from an MMOG, and the reason that I wait anxiously though patiently for Vanguard.

Moving on to the main point: At the endgame, cash doesn't matter in WoW. Yes, an ebayed CHARACTER could conceivably give an undeserving person any degree of power, but at max level, all the best equipment, by FAR, is BoP (no drop). All the debates between casuals and raiders and pvpers, on every level, deal with items that cannot be bought with gold. Having a lot of gold enables you to twink your character from 1-59, and to a very minor extent, furnish your character at 60 with equipment that could otherwise be obtained through a few instance runs. Occasionally a rare and sought-after BoE (tradeable) item will appear on the Auction House (AH), and only those with large sums of saved cash can get it, but I know every commonly sold high-end item in the game, and none of these come close to what is found on a raid.

This is all to say: gold farmers mostly affect casual players 1-59. Whether or not you possess rare or epic gear is not nearly as important in WoW as it was in EQ for the purposes of actually being able to solo content effectively. I remember seeing a hunter do a damn fine job of soloing mobs a few levels above his and his pet's, and I was surprised to find that his ranged weapon was of poor (grey) quality, doing almost no damage itself. Gear will matter in PvP at any level, but you can solo in WoW with just about anything from 1-60. Gold affords luxuries at these levels that don't matter nearly as much as people think they do (perhaps coming from an EQ mentality). And when you reach max level, there is nothing you can buy to improve your gear -- you must find it, or earn it via honor or faction.

Lastly, I should mention that one needn't buy gold in WoW nor spend all their time farming to have a lot of money -- the trading system provided by the AH (yet another of WoW's problems, and one of the things I think Vanguard will get right) allows anyone, with a minimal initial investment, to play the market and fairly obtain large sums of gold (as I have on three servers). But that gold is only so useful...the only truly valuable commodity in Azeroth is time.

Fyrestrom
06-16-2006, 02:21 AM
What I most wonder though, is how this can be stopped entirely. I know that the Goldfarmers won't agree with me, neither those who like to use their service, but it would be nice (and good for the in-games economy) if this kind of things hardly happened in Vanguard... or at all.

Preventing is always better than curing.

Would something as harsh as making cash 'nodrop' be the only way?

And how exactly does one make currency "No Drop"? That's just crazy talk.

Nakari
06-16-2006, 03:01 AM
Ok, so I am not going to claim to be an expert in what I'm about to ask, which is why, I suppose I need to ask the question. I never felt like there was much in the way of cheating that occured in the original EQ, especially towards the begining of the game. Now, it seems, that with games like WoW, and well, practically all of them, hackers and cheaters are thriving.

What is to keep that from happening in Vanguard? Is there something that can be done in the disign or production of a game that will help to prevent it? I'm just curious :)

Lord_Vyper
06-16-2006, 03:35 AM
What is to keep that from happening in Vanguard? Is there something that can be done in the disign or production of a game that will help to prevent it? I'm just curious :)
There are a plethora of ways Sigil could limit the number of potential cheaters. Unfortunately, almost all of these ways consume resources, either in people or in server hardware.
To give you an example, Sigil could log every movement every character makes in-game, and run those log through a filter to check for extremely repeditive patterns. Someone running a set pattern through spawn sites, always going the exact same distances, turning the exact same way, etc. That would catch almost every macroer, but it would require probably 5-10x the number of servers to crunch enough numbers fast enough to be worthwhile.